Guide To Preventing Damage To Your Roof

You need to be prepared in the event your roof system is damaged by strong winds or other bad weather. A sufficient plan needs to be in place including who you will call for repairs. The roof should also be inspected at least semi-annually as well as have a periodical moisture survey. If you don't perform inspections and do regular maintenance, you could cut the roof's life in half. Necessary Inspections Read More 

4 Reasons To Replace Your Asphalt Roof With Metal

Metal roofing is making a comeback as a durable and attractive option for residential roofing. It's a great buy for those who want to save money on energy, are tired of replacing their roof every twenty years, or are interested in improving their ecological footprint. If you're looking into replacing an asphalt roof and you're wondering what other options are out there, check out these four reasons why metal may be a good replacement for your current roof. Read More 

Tips For Safely Installing Holiday Decorations On Your Roof

As a new homeowner, one of the things you may be looking forward to is that first holiday season of decorations. If you've been thinking about putting some decorations up on your roof, there are a few key considerations that you need to be aware of. Here are a few things that you need to understand before you decorate your roof and risk potential damage or an accident. Safety is an essential element. Read More 

Signs That Tell You It Is Time For Some Repairs To Your Roof

It is vital to make sure that you will be able spot trouble with your roof and have it repaired by a professional before too much damage is done. To help ensure that you know what troubling signs you should be looking for, you will want to review the following points. A Few Shingles Are Missing From The Roof Do not make the mistake of assuming that a missing shingle or two is not a cause for concern. Read More 

How To Save Money On Cooling Costs With A Commercial Roof

Most commercial buildings are so large that building a sloped roof is not feasible. Thus, they will use a flat roof. The most common and least expensive material used to create a watertight flat roof is a BUR roof, which is made from alternating layers of tarpaper and asphalt tar. As such, flat roofs are black and readily absorb heat from the sun and then conduct that heat into your building. Read More